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Rocketeers in Orbit: Luke Wallace Recaps Mobile + Web DevCon

Mobile + Web DevCon has been growing in recent years, and every conference has a few trends that seem to permeate the atmosphere.  Here are some of the trends that Rocketeer, Luke Wallace noticed at the recent conference in San Francisco.

Mobile is bigger than desktop web for many companies

It’s no surprise that mobile platforms are becoming standard operating procedure for most companies, just take a look around places where people are waiting or bored, almost everyone is on their smartphone doing something. The real surprise is hearing from many companies that their mobile business (mobile web and/or native apps) is accounting for a huge percentage of their business, sometimes eclipsing their desktop users.

Every company has a slightly different perspective based on their own data, but because Bottle Rocket works with such a variety of clients, we can see trends across the entire industry. Mobile is definitely a huge part of business today, and is by far the way that most brands connect with their audience. This is not a trend that we see changing anytime soon.

Enterprise is aggressively going mobile

Much like the web, the initial App landscape was filled with a lot of fun apps that made entertainment more accessible. Now that the tools and capabilities have really matured, and are better understood, the enterprise world is embracing Apps and Mobile Web as solutions to real problems and ways to improve efficiency. With even more attention, there is a great need for developers and companies that can support their endeavors. 

It’s important to not forget that just because it’s Enterprise software, it doesn’t have to be boring. David M. Hogue spoke at Mobile + Web DevCon about Designing for People, and noted that “tasks can be fun, and fun can be productive,” so there’s no need for Enterprise tools to be any less engaging for the users.

People want everything, everywhere, on every device

One recurring theme through the entire conference was the notion of anytime, anywhere access to your services. Limiting yourself to one platform, even just limited to mobile, may cause users to find an alternative service for their needs. Mehdi Ghazizadeh from StubHub posed the common question, “Mobile Web or Native?” and answered “Both!” iOS or Android? Both! Phone or Tablet? Both! Users expect a great experience wherever they are, using whatever device they have access to. Maintaining a great experience through all of that can be a challenge, but it is what users will expect more and more over time.

Connected devices and wearables are growing interests

Although a smaller subset of the Mobile discussion, the “Internet of Things” is continuing to grow, with connected devices permeating the home and office. Technologies like Bluetooth LE, iBeacon, and the many wearable technologies are connecting people even more. It may still be several years before the technology is ubiquitous, but it would be a mistake to ignore it until that time. At Mobile + Web DevCon, Marko Gargenta gave a great introduction to Bluetooth LE on Android, and Cecilia Abadie spoke on wearable technology, and showed the new fitness app they are developing for Google Glass, LynxFit. The demonstration gave someone from the audience the chance to try it out, and the potential for such personalized experiences was hard to ignore.

Mobile + Web DevCon gave attendees a lot of insight into the mobile market from various perspectives, from big businesses to independent developers. Bottle Rocket takes these insights, along with those we get from our clients, and incorporates them into our daily business.  To learn more about Bottle Rocket, visit our contact page.  We would love to connect! 


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